Posts Tagged ‘Spider Man’

The first full trailer for Amazing Spider-Man 2 is up!

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Shailene Woodley as Mary JaneThe news is all over the place and I saw it first on BleedingCool, but Shailene Woodley’s role as Mary Jane Watson in the Amazing Spider-Man 2 has been cut from the film. There are several reasons this could have happened, two very big ones. Firstly, since she only filmed a couple of days it’s likely her role was just introductory and had nothing to do with the main plot meaning if they needed to cut something for time it’s that kind of sub-plot that would be the first thing to go. Secondly, as BleedingCool pointed out, since film makers are looking into the future now with probably two more films, they might want to hold off on MJ’s introduction instead of trying to cram her in.

Both are legit reasons that I’ll support.

However, there is one possible reason that I really hope isn’t it. You see, there was a lot of backlash against Shailene being picked to play Mary Jane. For some reason, a bunch of insolent fanboys have got it into their head that Shailene isn’t pretty enough. WTF? Here is a quote from the CinemaBlend article If You Think Shailene Woodley Isn’t Pretty Enough For The Amazing Spider-Man 2, You Don’t Deserve The Movie:

Yesterday we posted the first on-set images of Shailene Woodley as Mary Jane in The Amazing Spider-Man 2, currently in production in New York. Because they were pictures of an actress walking from place to place on the set, not in costume, the notable difference was seeing her hair tinted to Mary Jane’s signature red. Honestly, the photos weren’t that interesting. Until the comments started.

“Omg she looks horrible I hope they can do something with that face of hers.” “Mary Jane is supposed to be hot.” “Looks horrible as a redhead.” The comments on our site weren’t actually as bad as they were elsewhere on the Internet, and not half as bad as the so-called satire posted at Comic Book Movie, with instructions on how to make Woodley hot enough to play “every nerd’s wet dream.” The “satire” was so close to the real thing that most of their commenters didn’t get the difference, and reading it makes your skin crawl because you just know that’s exactly how a strong handful of fanboys feel, no irony intended.

It is so bad that when I typed ‘shailene woodley mary jane’ into Google to get a photograph it auto-suggested ‘shailene woodley mary jane ugly’. I have never done a search on her name before so that was something Google pulled up from the internet itself.

Really guys?

REALLY?!?

Just when I feel the need to defend fanboys against rampant complaints of how sexist and hostile the fandom can be towards women, I run across something like this.

If the hate was more of a ‘we prefer Gwen Stacey’s character’ or ‘Dunst is a better actress’ then I can see that being a decent debate. I also understand that everyone has a slightly different view of beauty. But to just go off and say that this lovely young woman is ugly and that Mary Jane only exists as a wet dream for nerds? That’s not a legitimate complaint, that’s a request for a swift kick to the balls. One I’ll happily oblige.

Maybe I’ve been blissfully innocent, but I’ve never seen this amount of hate towards the casting of a character based solely on his/her looks. I’ve seen complaints about how someone can’t act or how someone looks nothing like their character (and by nothing I mean changing big stuff like race/gender) but not vehement complaints of how they are ugly and not pretty enough. So maybe the MJ fanboys are the ‘asshole in every group’, after all, the comic book world fandom is quiet vast and there is one is every group…

Anyway, if Shailene was nixed for time or to give her introduction a more solid foundation, then I’m cool with that. But if the filmmakers bowed down like some shameless sycophants… then stop the world cause I’m 110% done and I want off.

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Deadpool #10Ever have one of those moments where you’re not sure if you should love something or loath it? That is Deadpool #10.

On the face of it, this issue is nothing but one big fan service, specifically, the Spideypool fandom. If you don’t know what Spideypool is, it’s just as it sounds, the idea that Spider-Man and Deadpool are a meant-to-be OTP. This is also by no means a small fandom and you could spend a lifetime just wading through the Spideypool tag on tumblr. So, yeah, there are tons of references to this in this team-up issue where Deadpool and Superior Spider-Man have a run in.

Here’s the thing though, it’s not Peter Parker anymore but Doc Oc… and Deadpool knows this. He makes several references to how Spidey isn’t acting like himself and also purposely bashed Doc Oc just to get a reaction. So does Deadpool know the truth because, well, he’s Deadpool and breaks the fourth wall all the time, or because Deadpool just knows Spider-Man that well, something that apparently is lacking in Spidey’s own comic.

Not being opposed of Spideypool, but also not being a fan of it, I find it hard to gage this issue. Spideypool fans could love it or really, they could hate it, same for non-Spideypool fans. It could be either read as an acknowledgement or as a piss-take. Not being deep on either side of the field I just don’t know where it falls.

It is pretty hilarious though, with some lovely moments of comedic timing. Though I am kinda disappointed in the concept of hell being pretty much Crowley’s hell from Supernatural (though, granted, it has been done before but very recently in Supernatural).

In the end, I’m just going to call this one a wash. I am so not getting into the middle of this…

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CinemaBlend – Bryan Singer Hints About Peter Dinklage’s X-Men: Days Of Future Past Character
“He’ll be himself. Not that he’ll be playing Peter Dinklage, he’ll be playing this character. It’s not a shy character. He’s just such a phenomenal actor; I’m a huge fan of Peter’s and Game of Thrones. He was my first choice and I was really happy [about the casting]. It’s so funny to talk to him because he does that impeccable accent [on Game of Thrones] and then you talk to him and he’s this guy from New Jersey.”

ComicBookMovie – Bryan Singer Teases Return Of  Scott And Jean In X-MEN: DOFP; Hints At Shared Fox Universe
When the site put it to him that a lot of fans would like to see Scott and Jean  return, he teased: “Who wouldn’t? Who wouldn’t? [Laughing] That’s all I can  say. The good news is that we’re all on the same page!”

ComicBookMovie – Bryan Singer Talks About His  Role In X-MEN: FIRST CLASS
“It would be [weird to direct Days of Future Past]  if I didn’t write the story for X-Men: First Class. I wrote the story to that  movie and I produced it and I was instrumental in the casting, in design and  involved in the post-production, so I was part of that movie. I initiated that  movie and originated it so in that way, and worked with Matthew and I was the  one who actually hired Matthew so in a way I feel like I’m not completely  entering someone else’s franchise. I’m entering one that he executed  wonderfully, but one that I was also part of.”

CinemaBlend – Captain America: The Winter Soldier Will Be A Political Thriller

ComicBookMovie – James Gunn Meets With DnA On  GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

CinemaBlend – Fantastic Four Reboot Adds Matthew Vaughn To Its Team

CinemaBlend – Stan Lee’s New Project Annihilator Brings Us A Chinese Captain America

ComicBookMovie – Doing Business With Marvel Studios – interesting…

CinemaBlend – Watch The Trailer For The Inspirational Batman Doc Legends Of The Knight

CinemaBlend – Megan Fox Joins Michael Bay’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Film – I thought these two didn’t get along?

ComicBookMovie – VIDEO GAMES: ESRB Has Rated  Deadpool the Video Game ‘M’ for Mature – anything less would be criminal

io9 – The 8 Incredibly Gross Powers Superman Doesn’t Even Realize He Has

io9 – Real-life Spidey Sense suit tingles when objects get close

Facebook – New Mandarin poster for Iron Man 3

Twitter – James Mangold shares another The Wolverine behind the scenes photo.

io9 – A mash-up of real-life bad guys with comic supervillains

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CinemaBlend – Man Of Steel’s Faora Revealed In Action Figure Form

CinemaBlend – Man Of Steel’s Amy Adams Performs Classic Lois Lane Moment For Jay Leno

ComicBookMovie – Could We See A Fully CG Character In X-MEN: DOFP? – this article not-so-subtle hints that the Sentinel could be the CGI character and this would make the most sense, if there to do the big, bulky robotic hunters then CGI would probably be the easiest and cheapest route to take

CinemaBlend – The Amazing Spider-Man 2 Set Photo Reveals Some Nausea-Inducing Equipment

CinemaBlend – Iron Man 3 Lego Sets Feature Possible Spoilers

BleedingCool – Marvel Increases Market Dominance In January 2013

ComicBookMovie – SPIDER-MAN Test Reel Shows Added Musculature to Tobey Maguire’s Costume

ComicBookMovie – Marvel VFX Exec. VP Talks THOR: THE DARK WORLD, GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY And More

CBR – How much does Thor’s hammer weigh?

CinemaBlend – Ben Affleck Was Asked To Play Batman In The Justice League Movie?

io9 – Myths About Joss Whedon (That Keep Non-Whedonistas Away)

deviantArt – ai-eye

Two Faceby ~ ai-eye

Two Face by ~ ai-eye

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Official Synopsis tl;dr "the blonde is going to die"

Official Synopsis tl;dr “the blonde is going to die”

Columbia Pictures has released the official plot synopsis for The Amazing Spider-Man 2 which just went into production. Here is the synopsis courtesy of CinemaBlend.

In The Amazing Spider-Man2, for Peter Parker (Andrew Garfield), life is busy – between taking out the bad guys as Spider-Man and spending time with the person he loves, Gwen (Emma Stone), high school graduation can’t come quickly enough.  Peter hasn’t forgotten about the promise he made to Gwen’s father to protect her by staying away – but that’s a promise he just can’t keep.  Things will change for Peter when a new villain, Electro (Jamie Foxx), emerges, an old friend, Harry Osborn (Dane DeHaan), returns, and Peter uncovers new clues about his past.

UPDATE: A more detailed synopsis is available via ComicBookMovie.

As CinemaBlend points out in their article, Harry Osborn, aka the second Green Goblin, appears in this film as Peter’s ‘old friend’ after having not been in the first movie. This isn’t too much of a stretch, people can be friends and due to school drift away after a year or so. It’s doubtful that Harry will be going Green in this film, though there is a good possibility that the set up for his villainy could take place in ASM2.

The other interesting part is the lack of mentioning of Paul Giamatti who could play The Rhino nor of Felicity Jones who could also be in the film as reported by The Hollywood Reporter (and now confirmed in the ComicBookMovie article). So either this report is wrong or their roles will be minor (or at least not key). This goes along with them not mentioning Shailene Woodley who will have a minor role as Mary Jane, a role that will be expanded in ASM3.

Gwen Stacey famously dies in the canon comics and Emma Stone expressed that not to kill Gwen off would be a disservice to her character and what it means for Peter when it happens. So, basically, ‘that’s a promise he just can’t keep’ is speak for ‘the blonde is going to die’.

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There is a great article below I’m rebloging from Newsarama about the recent uphevel in the comic book world over something that ‘might’ happen.

You see, the point of a serialized anything is to get you to come back each week, month, or whenever to buy the next issue or watch the next episode. This is why things like cliff-hangers were invented, not to mention teasers, solitations, trailers, etc. This can often be very fullfilling as you have something new to look forward to each week both in whatever the plot of that week’s issue/episode is and whatever you might learn about the over-reaching arc.

It’s natural to speculate on how things will play out: who might live/die, who might hook up, who is the killer, that kind of thing. However, in the modern age of instant feedback and instant gratification, that speculation is not left to languish over the week in a person’s own thoughts or a message board, instead, a million conversations take place instantly all feeding together like a hydra monster of sorts. When this happens, well, read the article below for a nice case study which can easily be applied to television as well:

Op/Ed: Super Serial – Monthly Storytelling Gets the Shaft

By Lucas Siegel, Newsarama Site Editor posted: 30 January 2013 02:55 pm  ET

It was the kiss heard round the world.

Doctor Octopus, who had recently taken over Spider-Man’s body, kissed Mary Jane Watson (unaware of the switch) passionately in the pages of Amazing Spider-Man #700, telling her he intended to renew their relationship. Before the kiss itself, he expressed how he was plotting to be with her, and she at one point tore open his shirt (revealing the Spider-Man costume). The villain pretending to be a hero looked at her lasciviously and clearly desired to have a romantic relationship with her…

And that, coupled with Superior Spider-Man #2‘s cover of the pair kissing again (or more accurately, Ock/Spidey stealing a kiss from the redhead), set off an internet firestorm, led by many respected commentators who one would assume know comics. People who have contributed to the industry through reports, criticism, and intelligent discussion started a fierce argument based, in the end, seemingly entirely on assumption and speculation.

MILD SPOILERS FOR SUPERIOR SPIDER-MAN #2 AHEAD

And now, with Superior Spider-Man #2 out and on the shelves, it all ends with Otto (again, somewhat gross and lasciviously) accessing Peter’s memories about his time with MJ. With great memories come great feelings, and now legitimately caring for her, decides to break things off entirely. Aside from that first big kiss in ASM #700 that set off the internet, all Otto wound up getting was a few pecks on the cheek.

 Now, the conversation about rape and how it’s portrayed/the subject is handled in comics and indeed all media is an extremely important (and sensitive) one, but not the subject of this article. We won’t be covering that today, and indeed, Steve Wacker didn’t discuss it at the time because it doesn’t actually happen in either of these comics. As Wacker said himself on Twitter when this first came up, “It’s an important topic, but I think it’s diminished by this kind of craziness.” Indeed, the only problem with how people approached the issues raised by ASM #700 and the subsequent covers is that they went after writer Dan Slott and editor Stephen Wacker simply because of potential. It seems to imply an ignorance of the serial nature of comic book storytelling, or at least a refusal to acknowledge it.

In two days of Twitter conversation about the subject, Wacker consistently tried to roll with any questions, and merely argued that readers should continue reading. His only direct comments about the issue itself were that the scene in ASM did not depict sex (true), and that people needed to read the first few issues of Superior to know how the story would play out. In other words, he did his exact job as editor of a serialized story — he told people to read it serially, as it came out, and didn’t spoil what his writer had, at that point, already written.

The ASM kiss

What this really speaks to is the nature of serialization in the internet age. With feedback and conversation truly instantaneous via Twitter and other social networks, solicitations showing covers and teasing at storylines three months ahead of time, and a constant need for immediate gratification, it seems that comic book readers may be losing the ability to simply enjoy serial fiction. Rather than thinking about what actually happens in the pages of a just-read book, readers have been trained — partially by themselves and peers in the internet indignation machine, partially by the culture of previews and interviews (of which we acknowledge our role in) — to always be thinking several months ahead in the future.

But covers have traditionally been misleading. Quick moments and cliffhangers and provocative covers — these are not only intended but necessary parts of a serial. Covers have nearly always had misleading elements, from announcing the death or retirement of a character to a misleading moment of passion between an unlikely pair. The whole point is to have a reader say “wait – what?” and have an intense desire to see what happens next. About a year and a half ago, another Marvel Comics cover showed a surprising kiss. Was Cyclops cheating on Emma Frost (who he had cheated with — mentally — on Jean Grey, of course)? Why would Storm be in his embrace and not with, you know, her husband at the time? Of course, it wound up being a misleading cover, showing an alternate reality. Indeed, scenes of romance and death are a traditional method of teasing readers to try to bring more eyes to the next issue. Again, it’s merely the definition of serialization.

 What people were angry about at first was the mere suggested possibility of more than a kiss, then the anger turned more towards Wacker and Slott’s unwillingness to accept their argument, or, in their own defense to tell readers how the story would play out a month in advance of the issues where the resolution took place. And that’s just not how serial storytelling is supposed to go.

So what’s the solution? Should solicitations not go out over the internet? That seems impossible at this stage, and fans have clear and easy access to the monthly Previews catalogue, anyway. Should creators and editors stay off of social networks and not interact with fans? Again, both impossible and frankly a bit silly. The positive examples of interaction are often overshadowed by the extreme fringe negatives with attacks and death threats, but the positeves tend to actually be more frequent and outweigh the negatives, with fans getting a behind-the-scenes look at the creation of the media they so enjoy.

No, the only real solution is for fans themselves to take a step back into the days when serial adventures were taken one at a time. Just because there can be an instant reaction doesn’t mean there has to be one.

At the very least, the tone of the far-too frequent internet indignation machine should be measured against both what we know and what we just think we know.

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